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Sunday, May 15, 2005

The Washington Nationals, circa 1863

Interesting AP piece on the Virginian-Pilot online site, looking at how baseball served as a balm for Union troops, including at the Battle of Chancellorsville. From the article: "The Civil War helped fuel a boom in the popularity of baseball evidenced by the fact that a ball club called the Washington Nationals was born in 1860 - 145 years before a Major League Baseball team was given the same name in D.C. this season.
Box scores from games played by New York soldiers were published in newspapers in places like Rochester.
They didn't look much like baseball box scores today. One game was 49-31."
If you like baseball history, this is worth the click: